Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Hairline
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STOREFRONT AND THEATRE
According To A 2006 Report
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Thin
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STABLE HOUSING MARKET
Volumes Were 5.3% Higher
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Light
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REGARDLESS OF TERRAIN
Highly Valued Back In 1929
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Regular
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EXPECTED IN NOVEMBER
The Greater Concentration
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 SemiBold
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SHORT-TERM INDICATOR
On Gallery And Exhibition
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Bold
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SKYSCRAPER BOOKCASE
Production Assembly Line
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Black
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TOUCH SCREEN DISPLAY
Appliance Manufacturers
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Hairline Oblique
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POINTS THE WAY FORWARD
Carry Two Alternate Versions
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Thin Oblique
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HOTEL AND RESTAURANTS
Capture And Filter Particles
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Light Oblique
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OVERVIEW OF THE WORK
Popular Notions Of Beauty
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Regular Oblique
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SAMPLES FROM VARIOUS
Sophisticated Optimization
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 SemiBold Oblique
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OLD BRICK AND MORTAR
She Conducted Interviews
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Bold Oblique
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DIFFERENT FRAGRANCES
Graduating The University
Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Black Oblique
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ENERGY FROM STORAGE
Never Worn Heels Before

Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Regular

The term sans-serif comes from the French word sans, meaning “without”. Sans-serif fonts tend to have less line width variation than serif fonts. In print, sans-serif fonts are used for headlines rather than for body text. The conventional wisdom holds that serifs help guide the eye along the lines in large blocks of text. Sans-serifs, however, have acquired considerable acceptance for body text in Europe. According to James Mosley's Typographica journal titled The Nymph and the Grot: the revival of the sanserif letter, the sans serif letters had appeared as early as 1748, as an inscription of Nymph in the Grotto in Stourhead. However, it was classified as an experiment rather than a sign of wide-scale adoption. Sans-serif letters began to appear in printed media as early as 1805, in European Magazine. However, early-19th-century commercial sign writers and engravers had modified the sans-serif styles of neoclassical designers to include uneven stroke weights found in serif Roman fonts, producing sans-serif letters. The term Sans-serif was first employed in 1830 by Figgins foundry.

Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Regular Oblique

The term sans-serif comes from the French word sans, meaning “without”. Sans-serif fonts tend to have less line width variation than serif fonts. In print, sans-serif fonts are used for headlines rather than for body text. The conventional wisdom holds that serifs help guide the eye along the lines in large blocks of text. Sans-serifs, however, have acquired considerable acceptance for body text in Europe. According to James Mosley's Typographica journal titled The Nymph and the Grot: the revival of the sanserif letter, the sans serif letters had appeared as early as 1748, as an inscription of Nymph in the Grotto in Stourhead. However, it was classified as an experiment rather than a sign of wide-scale adoption. Sans-serif letters began to appear in printed media as early as 1805, in European Magazine. However, early-19th-century commercial sign writers and engravers had modified the sans-serif styles of neoclassical designers to include uneven stroke weights found in serif Roman fonts, producing sans-serif letters. The term Sans-serif was first employed in 1830 by Figgins foundry.

Hurme Geometric Sans №2 SemiBold

The term sans-serif comes from the French word sans, meaning “without”. Sans-serif fonts tend to have less line width variation than serif fonts. In print, sans-serif fonts are used for headlines rather than for body text. The conventional wisdom holds that serifs help guide the eye along the lines in large blocks of text. Sans-serifs, however, have acquired considerable acceptance for body text in Europe. According to James Mosley's Typographica journal titled The Nymph and the Grot: the revival of the sanserif letter, the sans serif letters had appeared as early as 1748, as an inscription of Nymph in the Grotto in Stourhead. However, it was classified as an experiment rather than a sign of wide-scale adoption. Sans-serif letters began to appear in printed media as early as 1805, in European Magazine. However, early-19th-century commercial sign writers and engravers had modified the sans-serif styles of neoclassical designers to include uneven stroke weights found in serif Roman fonts, producing sans-serif letters. The term Sans-serif was first employed in 1830 by Figgins foundry.

Hurme Geometric Sans №2 SemiBold Oblique

The term sans-serif comes from the French word sans, meaning “without”. Sans-serif fonts tend to have less line width variation than serif fonts. In print, sans-serif fonts are used for headlines rather than for body text. The conventional wisdom holds that serifs help guide the eye along the lines in large blocks of text. Sans-serifs, however, have acquired considerable acceptance for body text in Europe. According to James Mosley's Typographica journal titled The Nymph and the Grot: the revival of the sanserif letter, the sans serif letters had appeared as early as 1748, as an inscription of Nymph in the Grotto in Stourhead. However, it was classified as an experiment rather than a sign of wide-scale adoption. Sans-serif letters began to appear in printed media as early as 1805, in European Magazine. However, early-19th-century commercial sign writers and engravers had modified the sans-serif styles of neoclassical designers to include uneven stroke weights found in serif Roman fonts, producing sans-serif letters. The term Sans-serif was first employed in 1830 by Figgins foundry.

Information

Hurme Geometric Sans No.2 includes seven weights with true SmallCaps and matching obliques. Please see the specimen PDF for complete overview of the typeface and its features. Alternate characters and other Opentype features makes the family a versitile tool that can be finetuned accoring to specific needs. Hurme Geometric Sans No.1 and No.2 are essentially the same fonts, but with different set of characters set on as default. All the other characters can be accessed trough Opentype features.

When buying Hurme Geometric Sans No.2, you will receive corresponding weights of Hurme Geometric Sans No.1 free of charge.

Related families

Download PDF specimens

Styles included in family

  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Hairline
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Thin
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Light
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Regular
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 SemiBold
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Bold
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Black
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Hairline Oblique
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Thin Oblique
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Light Oblique
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Regular Oblique
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 SemiBold Oblique
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Bold Oblique
  • Hurme Geometric Sans №2 Black Oblique

Supported languages

Afrikaans, Albanian, Alsatian, Aragonese, Arrernte, Asturian, Aymara, Basque, Bislama, Bokmål, Bosnian (Latin), Breton, Catalan, Cebuano, Chamorro, Cheyenne, Cimbrian, Cornish, Corsican, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Frisian, Friulian, Gaelic (Manx), Gaelic (Scottish), Gagauz (Latin), Galician, Genoese, German, Haitian Creole, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Hmong, Hopi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Interlingua, Irish, Irish Gaelic, Istro-Romanian, Italian, Japanese transliteration, Jèrriais, Kapampangan (Latin), Karelian, Kashubian, Kiribati, Korean transliteration, Kurdish (Latin), Ladin (Gardena), Ladin (Valle di Badia), Languedocien, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lombard, Lower Sorbian, Luxembourgeois, Macedo-Romanian, Malagasy, Malay (Latin), Maltese, Manx, Maori, Marshallese, Megleno-Romanian, Mohawk, Moldavian (Latin), Montenegrin (Latin), Naxi (Latin), Ndebele, Norwegian, Occitan, Oromo, Pangasinan, Papiamento, Piedmontese, Polish, Portuguese, Potawatomi, Quechua, Rhaeto-Romanic, Romanian, Romansch, Rotokas, Saint Lucia Creole, Sami (Inari), Sami (Lule), Samoan, Sardinian, Scots Gaelic, Serbian (Latin), Seychelles Creole, Shona, Sicilian, Slovak, Slovene, Somali (Latin), Sorbian, Southern Sotho transliteration, Spanish, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tausug (Latin), Tetum, Tok Pisin, Tongan, Tswana, Turkish, Turkmen (Latin), Tuvalu, Upper Sorbian, Veps, Volapük, Votic, Walloon, Warlpiri, Welsh, Xhosa, Zhuang, Zulu.

Under Purchase options, please select the style and add the licences/quantities you need for each style. After your payment is done, you will receive the font files within minutes. If you have any questions or need technical support, please contact us.

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